Wednesday, August 12, 2015


10 nations where the penalty
for gay sex is death



79 countries where homosexuality is illegal
79 countries where homosexuality is illegal
Ten nations with large Muslim populations have laws providing for the death penalty for same-sex activity. How many actually impose the death sentence is a difficult question.

According to the 2015 State-Sponsored Homophobia report from ILGA, the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association:

In relation to death penalty, eight States officially legislate for it, but only five (Mauritania, Sudan, Iran, Saudi Arabia and Yemen) actually implement it. …

Further, some provinces in Nigeria and Somalia officially implement the death penalty.

Nigeria and Somalia bring the total to 10, as cited in this article’s introductory sentence: “Ten nations with large Muslim populations have laws providing for the death penalty for same-sex activity.” That total would be extended to 13 by adding Brunei Darussalam (law scheduled to take effect in 2016), Iraq (executions imposed despite the lack of a law allowing for them) and the Islamic State (executions imposed by an entity that acts as a nation but without international recognition as such).

However, news coverage in each of those nations is unreliable at best, so specific evidence of executions for same-sex intimacy is rare. In some countries, the death penalty for homosexual behavior may only be threatened, not carried out.

In Sudan, the death penalty is in frequent use, but there are no recent reports of executions for same-sex intimacy. Sudan ranked at No. 6 worldwide in number of executions (23+) in 2014, just below the United States, with 35, according to Amnesty International.

Similarly, Yemen is No. 7 in frequency of executions overall, but the death penalty apparently has not been imposed recently for homosexual activity. Researchers for Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board reported more than 10 years ago, “Information on whether such sentences have been carried out was not found.” More recently an article on Yemen’s gay community in The Tower magazine stated, “Traditionally, that death penalty is not enforced, but citizens have been imprisoned for their sexual orientation.”

Saudi Arabia is No. 3 among the world’s most avid executioners, with 90+ in 2014. At least in the past, beheadings were imposed for homosexual behavior, including three men in 2002. Imprisonment and lashings are a more common punishment for same-sex activity.

Iran is No. 2 in the world for frequency of executions, behind China. Those include executions for homosexual activity, although the facts are often unclear or misrepresented in such cases. (See, for example, “Bogus hanging in Iran, bogus tweets in Egypt” and “Series of public hangings in Iran, including 2 for sodomy.”)

Evidence is a bit clearer about two war-torn areas — Iraq and the territory controlled by Daesh/the Islamic State (ISIS/ISIL). The ILGA report notes that “a sixth State, Iraq, although [the death penalty is] not in the civil code, clearly has judges and militias throughout the country that issue the death sentence for same-sex sexual behaviours. … We are also aware that in the Daesh(ISIS/ISIL)-held areas the death penalty is implemented (although a non-State actor, it is listed in the report). ” For examples, see:


In some nations, the death penalty is on the books but is not imposed. ILGA states:

Brunei Darussalam is due to activate the death penalty for same-sex sexual acts in 2016, but it seems likely that like Pakistan, Afghanistan and Qatar although it is on the statute, it will not be implemented.

According to the U.S. Department of State, Mauritania belongs in this category too. A U.S. Department of State cable from 2009, released by WikiLeaks in 2011, indicated that Mauritania has never imposed the death penalty for homosexual activity or any other crime.

Here is a summary of all the information above in list form — a best-information-available list of 13 countries/regions where executions for homosexual activity are carried out or are provided by current or future law:

Nations with such laws on the books; executions have been carried out

Nations with such laws on the books; no recent executions reported

Nations with such laws on the books in part of the country; executions have or may have occurred

Nations with such laws on the books; no executions reported

Nation where such a law is scheduled to take effect in 2016

Nation with no such a law on the books; executions are carried out by militias and others

Not recognized as a nation; carries out executions


For more information:


Source: 76crimes, August 10, 2015



By the Way, What Does Islam Say About Being Gay?

At the heart of the Islamic view on homosexuality lies the biblical story of Sodom and Gomorrah, which is narrated in the Quran, too. According to scripture, the Prophet Lot had warned his people of “immorality,” for they did “approach men with desire, instead of women.” In return, the people warned by Lot tried to expel their prophet from the city, and even tried to sexually abuse the angels who came down to Lot in the guise of men. Consequently, God destroyed the people of Lot with a colossal natural disaster, only to save the prophet and a few fellow believers.
The average conservative Muslim takes this story as a justification to stigmatize gays, but there is an important question that deserves consideration: Did the people of Lot receive divine punishment for being homosexual, or for attacking Lot and his heavenly guests?
The even more significant nuance is that while the Quran narrates this divine punishment for Sodom and Gomorrah, it decrees no earthly punishment for homosexuality — unlike the Old Testament, which clearly decrees that homosexuals “are to be put to death.”
Medieval Islamic thinkers inferred an earthly punishment by considering homosexuality as a form of adultery. But significant names among them, such as the eighth-century scholar Abu Hanifa, the founder of the popular Hanafi school of jurisprudence, argued that since a homosexual relationship did not produce offspring with an unknown father, it couldn’t be considered adultery.
The real Islamic basis for punishing homosexuality is the hadiths, or sayings, attributed to the Prophet Muhammad. (The same is true for punishments on apostasy, heresy, impiety, or “insults” of Islam: None come from the Quran; all are from certain hadiths.) But the hadiths were written down almost two centuries after the prophet lived, and their authenticity has been repeatedly questioned — as early as the ninth century by the scholar Imam Nesai — and they can be questioned anew today. Moreover, there is no record of the prophet actually having anyone punished for homosexuality.
Such jurisprudential facts might help Muslims today to develop a more tolerant attitude toward gays, as some progressive Islamic thinkers in Turkey, such as Ihsan Eliacik, are encouraging. What is condemned in the story of Lot is not sexual orientation, according to Mr. Eliacik, but sexual aggression. People’s private lives are their own business, he argues, whereas the public Muslim stance should be to defend gays when they are persecuted or discriminated against — because Islam stands with the downtrodden.
It is also worth recalling that the Ottoman Caliphate, which ruled the Sunni Muslim world for centuries and which the current Turkish government claims to emulate, was much more open-minded on this issue. Indeed, the Ottoman Empire had an extensive literature of homosexual romance, and an accepted social category of transvestites. The Ottoman sultans, arguably, were social liberals compared with the contemporary Islamists of Turkey, let alone the Arab World.
Click here to read the full article
Source: The New York Times, The Opinion Pages, Mustafa Akyol, July 28, 2015. Mustafa Akyol is the author of “Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty.”

7 comments:

yves said...

Petit rappel :
Il y a 25 ans, le 4 août (*) 1982, sur une proposition de ministre de la Justice, Robert Badinter, l'Assemblée Nationale vote la dépénalisation de l'homosexualité. Dans les faits, elle n’était plus condamnée, mais la majorité sexuelle était fixée à 18 ans, contre 15 ans pour les hétérosexuels. Avec l'abrogation de l'article 332-1 du code pénal, elle passe à 15 ans pour tous. L’homosexualité sera retirée de la liste des maladies mentales de l'OMS (Organisation Mondiale de la Santé) en 1991. D'après un rapport de l’ILGA (International Lesbian and Gay Association), elle reste pénalisée dans près d'un pays sur deux.
Je salue votre courage militant, AC.
(*) Décidément, les nuits de 4 aôut revêtent un caractère exceptionnel. La nuit du 4 août 1789 est un événement fondamental de la Révolution française, puisque, au cours de la séance qui se tenait alors, l'Assemblée constituante met fin au système féodal. C'est l'abolition de tous les droits et privilèges féodaux ainsi que de tous les privilèges des classes, des provinces, des villes et des corporations, à l'initiative du Club breton, futur « Club des Jacobins ».

JiEL said...

Forcé de constater que ces pays sont en majorité dans des pays où l'Islam et la religion qui les dirige.

On est loin d'une tolérance planétaire..

Ne sommes nous pas en 2015? .. OUFF!

Il y a longtemps qu'ici aussi l'homosexualité n'est plus judiciarisé.
Même plus, maintenant on est des citoyens reconnus avec les mêmes droits que les hétéros. Mariage, adoption et bénéfices fiscaux inclus.

another country said...

Les religions - toutes les religions - sont une plaie.

yves said...

cher AC, n'est-pas mr de Talleyrand qui disait que le politique et la religion sont les deux drogues préférées du peuple ? ayant pratiqué les deux, il savait de quoi il en retournait !

another country said...

L'évêque d'Autun ?... LOL.

Vous savez que ce blog accueille fréquemment (parfois quotidiennement) des visiteurs en provenance du Vatican ? J'en profite pour les saluer.

yves said...

vérole de moine, heu non !
Doux Jésus, père AC, pourrez-vous m'entendre en confession ?
ceci dit, je dois reconnaitre que sans les Oratoriens, je serais resté un moins que rien. ma vocation de théâtre vient de la vision du RP Séradin tombant soutane et jouant en short et chaussettes mi-mollet Scapin ! ça, c'est tout de même quelque chose. I-NOU-BLI-A-BLE.
sinon, je serais probablement devenu religieux : tout le monde venait se confier à moi, bref, une âme de curé.
maintenant, je reçois encore des confidences, je n'ai jamais su à quoi ça tenait. ma bobine sans doute. par contre, j'ai très vite converti mes p'tits camarades aux délices de la chair... et ça continue aussi. Seigneur, pauvre de moi qui adore pêcher !

JiEL said...

Mes mais Daniel et Serge en visite à Rome, m'ont rapporté un calendrier de «jeunes beaux petits novices».....

J'ose imaginer ce qu'ils font dans les dortoirs...
Peut-être se pratiquent-ils à branler leur goupillons...

MMM !