Sunday, April 24, 2016


Lunar Panoramas

"Most of the film magazines taken during the Apollo flights have been scanned in high resolution format and made available on the web through the Project Apollo Archive. I used these images to create panoramas using Panorama Maker from Arcsoft. In the same spirit as Olivier de Goursac in his book "Lune" I "cleaned" the images, removing scratches and cross hair references for instance. The results are high-resolution photos of how the Moon appeared to the Apollo astronauts. In some instances, since the astronaut not taking the photos moved, he may appear twice on the panorama. In other cases, I had to use details from more that one mission to recreate some missing details. This is indicated for each panorama. Here are some of the results of my work..." See more: Lunar Panoramas




Apollo 11, Sea of Tranquility, 20 July 1969, frames A11-40-5864, 65 and A11-40-5869. After Armstrong picked up the camera and took the contingency samples, Aldrin started to descend the LM [Lunar Module] ladder to set foot on the Moon. One of his first tasks was to test the ability to reach the first rung of the ladder and we can see him preparing to make a jump. Note also the jettison bag just beneath the descent stage of the LM; this was the first item ever put on the lunar surface by humans...



Apollo 12, Ocean of Storms, EVA 1, 19 November 1969, frames A12-46-6717 and A12-46-6718. Pete Conrad is on the ladder. We can see his RCU, hose connections and checklist. Note that his OPS antenna is up. The porch and the lunar surface below are reflected in his visor. Alan Bean is taking the picture by holding the camera upside-down, at knee height, and is guessing at the pointing...



Apollo 14, Fra Mauro Highlands, EVA 1, 5 February 1971, frames A14-66-9229 and A14-66-9341. Ed Mitchell took this photograph of Alan Shepard's first steps on the Moon. This picture was the very first taken during EVA [Extravehicular activity] 1 from the LMP [Lunar Module Pilot] window. It is combined here with one of the very last pictures also taken from the LMP window at the end of EVA 2. Note the effect of "wind" on the Moon, as parallel traces around pebbles can be seen. This is due to the descent engine exhaust prior to landing...




Apollo 15, Hadley Rille/Apennine Mountains , EVA 3, 2 August 1971, frames A15-82-11056 and A15-82-11057. Jim Irwin took a panorama of the the Swann range with Falcon in the foreground before they drove to Station 9 and explore the Hadley Rille...




Apollo 16, Descartes Highlands, EVA 3, 23 April 1972, frames A16-117-18815 to A16-117-18820. Panorama taken by Charlie Duke at the end of EVA-3 at Station 10. John Young is pointing the high gain antenna towards the Earth. Note the LM on the left and the ALSEP [Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package] on the right...




Apollo 17, Taurus-Littrow, EVA 1, 11 December 1972, frames A17-134-20420 to A17-134-20425. Panorama taken by Gene Cernan at Station 1. Jack Schmidt is shown shaking soil out of the rake after making a swath through the surface soil. Seismic Charge 6 can be seen between the LRV and Jack Schmidt...


How far to let two Rover-riding astronauts go?

'No scene could have conveyed more vividly the reach of this exploration -- or the risk. If something had happened to the Rover now, Scott and Irwin [Apollo 15] would have faced a long and difficult walk to safety, for the LM was now more than 3 miles away -- much more than the distance covered by Shepard and Mitchell [Apollo 14] during their round trip to Cone crater. The whole question of how far to let two Rover-riding astronauts go had consumed hours of pre-mission deliberation. At no time could the men be allowed to drive farther than they could walk back with the amount of oxygen remaining in their backpacks. Because their oxygen supply dwindled as the moonwalk progressed, this walkback limit would be an ever tightening circle.
Even if the Rover worked flawlessly -- and so far, it had done nearly that -- there was always the chance that a backpack would fail. In that case, the men would break out a set of hoses that would allow them to share cooling water. The man with the failed backpack would survive on his own emergency pack, which contained about an hour's worth of oxygen, and, if necessary, his partner's emergency pack, allowing more than enough time for the Rover to race back to the lander. A more dire scenario was that both the Rover and a backpack might break down. For a time, this remote possibility had so worried the managers that they considered writing the mission rules around it -- a change that would have severely limited Scott and Irwin's explorations. In the end, NASA bought the risk of the double failure, knowing that if it came to pass, one of the astronauts would not make it back to the lander alive.'
-- Andrew Chaikin, A Man on the Moon - The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts, Penguin Books Ltd., 1994

4 comments:

JiEL said...

Toujours des images impressionnantes..

another country said...

Oui, ces images nettoyées et recomposées sont proposées en haute résolution, et c'est un véritable plaisir que de zoomer "in" et de les parcourir en tous sens... J'ai consacré plusieurs heures à cette "exploration" cet après-midi et j'ai eu envie de partager mon voyage immobile avec mes quelques et rares lecteurs. :) Pour afficher les photos en HR sans les décharger, Right click + open image in new tab.

Enjoy, guys!

yves said...

merci !
mais je ne vous imaginais pas dans la lune à ce point-là !

another country said...

Je suis sur Mars (and beyond)... Je ne suis généralement pas fan des images historiques trafiquées (colorisées, recadrées, "dépoussiérées", sonorisées, etc.) mais j'aime beaucoup le travail de ce garçon, qui vise essentiellement à restituer le panorama qui s'offrait aux yeux des astronautes d'Apollo.