Wednesday, July 12, 2017


Through over 400 objects, Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive at the Museum of Modern Art considers the great American architect’s career from unexpected angles

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) does not attempt to offer a retrospective of Wright’s career, or even to focus on his more well-known projects.
While Fallingwater and the Guggenheim do appear in his gorgeous architectural drawings and recently-conserved studio models, the galleries tackle more unexpected themes like Wright’s work on the 1923 Imperial Hotel in Tokyo that framed Japanese gardens with vertical windows, and his decades-long promotion of the Little Farms Unit, a prefabricated self-sustaining home and agricultural site. Discarded ideas including an orange or pink marble Guggenheim Museum are displayed alongside a newly conserved model of the unconstructed 1927-29 St. Mark’s Tower development for St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery.
The exhibition, organized by MoMA curator Barry Bergdoll, is timed with the 150th anniversary of Wright’s birth, and is mostly sourced from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, jointly acquired by MoMA and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library in 2012. (Source: Hyperallergic, Allison Meyer, June 30, 2017)
Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is June 12 to October 1 at the Museum of Modern Art (11 West 53rd Street, Midtown, Manhattan).



Frank Lloyd Wright, Ennis House, Los Angeles, perspective from the southwest (1924–25),
pencil, colored pencil, and ink on tracing paper, 20 1/8 x 39 1/8 inches (courtesy the
Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives; the Museum of Modern Art/Avery Architectural
& Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)



Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater (Kaufmann House), Mill Run, Pennsylvania,
perspectivefrom the south (1934–37), pencil and colored pencil on paper,
5 3/8 × 25 1/4 inches (courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives;
the Museum of Modern Art/Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library,
Columbia University, New York)



Frank Lloyd Wright, Plan for Greater Baghdad, Baghdad, aerial perspective
of the cultural center and University from the north (1957), ink, pencil, and colored
pencil on tracing paper, 34 7/8 x 52 inches (courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright
Foundation Archives; the Museum of Modern Art/Avery Architectural
& Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)


Frank Lloyd Wright, Rosenwald Foundation School, Hampton Normal and Agricultural
Institute, Virginia (1928), pencil and colored pencil on tracing paper, 12 3/4 x 25 7/8 inches
(courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives; the Museum of Modern
Art/Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)



Frank Lloyd Wright, Unity Temple, Oak Park, Illinois, perspective from the west (1905–08),
watercolor and ink on paper, 12 × 25 1/8 inches (courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright
Foundation Archives; the Museum of Modern Art/Avery Architectural
& Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)



Frank Lloyd Wright, Winslow House, River Forest, Illinois, perspective (1893–94),
watercolor with pencil on paper, 12 × 32 5/8 inches (courtesy the Frank Lloyd Wright
Foundation Archives; the Museum of Modern Art/Avery Architectural
& Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York)



Installation view of Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive
at the Museum of Modern Art (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)



Installation view of Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive
at the Museum of Modern Art (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)



Model of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York (1943-59), on view
in Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive at the Museum
of Modern Art (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

2 comments:

JiEL said...

Un de mes architectes préférés.

Tellement il sait unir nature et architecture.

Un grand artiste des formes habitables.

Esta Noche said...

C'est aussi le mien.

Ces tirages géants trouveraient parfaitement leur place sur mes murs. *sigh*